Fact Sheets

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Montana Wind Basics

Transmission

Economic Benefits

True Cost of Wind

 

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Montana Wind Resources
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Renewable NW Project
Vestas Americas
Wind Chasers LLC
AWEA

Real Benefits

Local farmers, county coffers, and state revenues. These are the real beneficiaries of locally produced, clean wind energy.

Real Projects

Wind energy is a reality in Montana. Find a list of Montana wind projects here.

 

Homegrown Energy
Equals Jobs &
Economic Opportunity

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Fact:
Renewable energy projects mean jobs for Montanans.

A typical 100 MW wind energy project supports between 100 and 155 construction phase jobs and 10-11 permanent operation and maintenance jobs (normally 20-25 years).1,2 Judith Gap, a 140 MW wind project, currently employs 12 full-time staff and 75% of the construction costs for building the Judith Gap wind farm went to Montana based contractors.3 Glacier Wind phases 1 (106.5 MW) & 2 (103.5 MW) each generated 150 construction jobs and each currently employ 10 full-time staff.4

Fact:
Montanans prosper by leasing their land for wind development.

A typical lease is $4,000-$10,000 per turbine per year ($2,000-$5,000 per MW).5 Families can continue working their land while while diversifying their incomes and securing their future.

Fact:
Wind projects generate new state and local tax revenues.

The four commercial wind projects currently operating in Montana, which total 384 MW, generated $5.4 million in property taxes in 2010. By 2018, this amount will grow to $9.0 million annnually.6 On average, 65.5% of this goes to local governments while 34.5% goes to the state.7

Fact:
The total state/local benefits of Montana wind projects are important.

Economic benefits of the Judith Gap project's five-year life thus far are real and significant, totaling over $30,000,000.8 The planned 309 MW Rim Rock project will bring another $800 million in local capital investment, 500 constructions jobs, and 30 permanent local jobs to Glacier and Toole Counties.9

Fact:
1,000 MW of wind power means prosperity for Montana.

1,000 MW of wind development would create 1,000 – 1,550 construction phase jobs and over 100 permanent jobs. In addition, it would generate between $4 million and $10 million in annual lease payments, and
$5 million - $10 million in annual property tax payments.10

December 27, 2010


References

1) National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Wind Model. July, 2009. Available from: http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/jedi/about_jedi_wind.html.
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2) Renewable Northwest Project. Wind Power & Economic Development: Real Examples from Washington. February, 2009. Available from: http://www.rnp.org/node/RNP-reports-and-fact-sheets.
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3) Invenergy, LLC. Personal communication.
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4) NaturEner, Inc. Personal communication.
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5) Costanti, Mike and Beltrone, Peggy. US Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Wind Energy Guide for County Commissioners. November, 2006. Available from: http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy07osti/40403.pdf.
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6) Montana Department of Commerce, Energy Promotion and Development Division. Montana Means Energy. Volume 1, Issue 7. December 2010.
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7) Montana Department of Commerce. Personal Communication.
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8) Calculated as sum of: Royalty payments ($5,000 x 90 turbines x 5 years), Jobs (12 jobs x $50,000 average salary), Taxes and Fees ($2,000,000 x 5 years), Construction dollars ($17,000,000).
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9) Montana Department of Commerce, Energy Promotion and Development Division. Montana Means Energy. Volume 1, Issue 7. December 2010.
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10) Costanti, Mike and Beltrone, Peggy. US Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Wind Energy Guide for County Commissioners. November, 2006. Available from: http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy07osti/40403.pdf.
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